November 28, 2022

Lamborghini ends production of combustion cars only

Lamborghini will only discontinue its combustion engine cars. The Italian manufacturer’s decision is in line with forced electrification in Europe, where there is tremendous pressure to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

In order not to conflict with this policy on the mainland, Lamborghini has announced that 2022 will be the last year that the brand will use only V10 5.2 and V12 6.5 engines in its cars.

From 2023, the Taurus brand will start producing plug-in hybrid models, but in 2024, the entire portfolio will be electric. This means that the Urus will also use a V8 4.0 electric motor.

“This will be the last time we will introduce combustion-only engines,” said Stephan Winkelmann, CEO of Lamborghini.

Lamborghini ends production of combustion cars only

However, the Italians will keep the combustion engines on board their cars for a long time, since the Audi Artemis project does not include super sports cars such as the Huracan and the Aventador.

Winkelmann said there will be four new models in the coming months and $1.7 billion will be allocated to boosting Lamborghini’s hybridization over the next few years.

With this, the brand hopes to reduce CO2 emissions and increase the efficiency of its cars, but without sacrificing performance.

For Lamborghini and other supercar makers, hybridization is more complex than full electric.

Lamborghini ends production of combustion cars only

With weight being a villain in the story, it’s necessary to drop more pounds to get the heavy electric motor, as well as the batteries, adapter and control unit.

All this is added to the super sports car that must keep fit so as not to make a mistake when accelerating.

In addition, there is the issue of the image. At Lamborghini, the brand of the Volkswagen Group, it seems to have settled down with loyal and enthusiastic customers.

Lamborghini’s rivals, Ferrari and Aston Martin, still face the dilemma of electricity, especially as the end of the big combustion engines approaches.

[Fonte: Auto News Europe]