Opening Day: Live Updates: NPR

Kamala Harris is sworn in as Vice President by Assistant Judge of the US Supreme Court Sonia Sotomayor as her husband Doug Imhoff looks at her.

Alex Wong / Getty Images


Hide the caption

Toggle caption

Alex Wong / Getty Images

Kamala Harris is sworn in as Vice President by Assistant Judge of the US Supreme Court Sonia Sotomayor as her husband Doug Imhoff looks at her.

Alex Wong / Getty Images

Kamala Harris was sworn in as Vice President of the United States, becoming the first woman, first black woman, and first Asian American to hold the position. She is also the first graduate From Black College historically and the first member of a black sorority to do so.

Judge Sonia Sotomayor took the oath. Sotomayor, the first woman of color to serve on the Supreme Court, previously ran Biden’s vice president’s division in 2013.

Harris used two Bibles at the ceremony. The first belongs to Regina Shelton, A family friend whom Harris considered a surrogate mother. Harris has used this bible before, when she was sworn in as a California attorney general and US senator. The Second Bible was formerly owned by the late Judge Thurgood Marshall, the first black member of the Supreme Court and Harris’ lifelong political model.

In a recent interview With Scott Detro from NPRHarris thought of the moment she would be sworn in as Vice President. “I will think of my mother, who is looking from the sky. I will think of all the people who depend on us to drive,” she said.

READ  Snowstorm in Japan: 1,000 people are stuck overnight in a 9-mile traffic jam

Harris often quotes her mother Shyamala Gopalan Harris, In speeches. A common refrain she attributes to her mother: “You may be the first to do many things, but make sure you are not the last.”

At the start of the ceremony, Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar said of Harris: “When you take the oath, young boys and girls all over the world will know that everything and everything is possible. In the end, this is America.”

The vice president’s oath differs slightly from the presidential oath, in proportion to the oath that members of Congress take:

“I, _________, solemnly swear [or affirm] That I will support and defend the United States Constitution against all enemies, abroad and at home; That I will carry true faith and loyalty to her; To assume this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or any purpose of evasion; And to perform the duties of the position that I am about to enter into faithfully and sincerely: God help me. “

Written By
More from Arzu

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *