August 19, 2022
Scientists report first case of meningitis in a rare shark - Revista Galileu

Scientists report first case of meningitis in a rare shark – Revista Galileu

A specimen of a Greenland shark estimated to be 100 years old was found stuck near a harbor in Cornwall (Photo: Cornwall Marine Pathology Team)

A rare specimen of the Greenland shark (Somniosus microcephaly) was found dead in Cornwall, an area in southwest England, with a brain infection described as Meningitis. It is believed that this is the first case of the disease in this species, which was still unknown before Science.

The female, probably 100 years old and 3.96 meters long, was found stranded on March 13 near the port of Newlin. Two days later, it was pulled from the sea, and the Corniche marine pathology team performed the analysis. after death.

The female Greenland shark is 3.96 meters long (Photo: Cornwall Marine Pathology Team)

The female Greenland shark is 3.96 meters long (Photo: Cornwall Marine Pathology Team)

According to experts, evidence of meningitis explains why sharks are so far away from their natural habitat – the deep waters of North Pole he is from North Atlantic – And the fact that she drifted. These animals live at a depth of about 2,600 meters in the sea, and are still a mystery to the scientific community, and It can live for more than 400 years.

“body shark She was in poor condition and there were signs of soft tissue hemorrhage around her pectoral fins, which, along with the slime in her stomach, suggested she might be stuck alive,” reports James Barnett, pathologist on the team who animal lesson, in Press release from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL, its English acronym).

The specialist also provided details of the circumstances under which brain From the shark it was. During the exam after deaththe brain appeared to be discolored and slightly engorged, and the fluid around the brain was cloudy, increasing the possibility of infection,” Barnett describes. bacteria PastillaIt may be the cause of meningitis.

Rob Deaville, head of ZSL’s Cetacean Stranding Research Program, warns of the risks to these animals due to human influence. “Ultimately, like most marine organisms, deep-sea species such as Greenland sharks can also be affected by human pressures in the ocean, but there is not enough evidence at this point to make any links,” Deville says. The researchers plan to publish their findings on this condition in a study.