August 19, 2022
The aurora borealis: the "blue hole" in the sky of Sweden that allows observing this phenomenon and the "moon rainbow"

The aurora borealis: the “blue hole” in the sky of Sweden that allows observing this phenomenon and the “moon rainbow”

  • Lola Akenmade Schekerström
  • BBC Travel*

attributed to him, Getty Images

Illustrative image,

Abisko is one of Sweden’s northernmost cities, located 250 km north of the Arctic Circle.

“I’m not really sure if we’ll ever see the northern lights,” my fellow video producer Eric Jarker said, watching the fog around us.

I was driving along the only road that leads to one of the northernmost cities in Sweden – Abisko, located 250 kilometers north of the Arctic Circle. We were caught in the middle of a snowstorm with no clear view, and all around us, the Abisko National Park mountains looked like a white sea.

We were traveling to photograph the ephemeral aurora, a stunning natural light show that occurs when explosions on the sun’s surface – so-called solar flares – collide with gases in Earth’s atmosphere, creating shimmering streaks tinged with red, green and purple.

To see the Northern Lights activity, we need a clear, icy, clear sky, not the winter storm we were going through.