The Trump campaign faces another legal setback in the Wisconsin case

Skadar said that the electoral changes were not significant enough to contravene the provisions of the constitution which stipulate that state legislatures determine the method for selecting presidential electors. He also criticized Trump for challenging those judgments after the election, not before.

“The president had a full opportunity before the election to press the same challenges of Wisconsin law that underlie his current allegations. Having lost that opportunity, he cannot now – with the election results certified as final – seek to address those challenges,” Scudder wrote. All this is especially important given that long before the elections the commission announced the guidelines that it is now defying. “

The federal appeals court said its role is not to enforce the specifics of state law, but to ensure adherence to the basic outline approved by the state legislature.

“Whatever actions the committee took here, it has taken on the color of the authority expressly granted to it by the legislature.” This power is not diminished by allegations that the commission erred in its exercise, Scudder wrote.

The president’s legal defeat on Thursday in the Court of Appeals came as the US Supreme Court remained silent on Trump’s latest bid to get judges to face a similar challenge in Pennsylvania. Trump’s attorneys asked the Supreme Court to order Keystone officials to respond by noon Wednesday, but the court took no action as the Americans prepared for their long weekend.

Republicans were also rejected Thursday afternoon by a Georgia court due to an attempt to tighten restrictions on drop-boxes and increase polling observers’ access in connection with the dual run-off elections for the Senate scheduled for January 5.

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At the end of a 90-minute hearing held via Zoom, Fulton County Supreme Court Judge Kimberly Esmond Adams dismissed the lawsuit filed earlier this month by the Republican National Committee and the Republican Party of Georgia.

Adams ruled that “this court has no jurisdiction to hear it due to sovereign immunity,” referring to a legal principle that restricts many lawsuits against state and federal governments in cases that have been specifically mandated under the legislation.

During the hearing, the state’s top election attorney appeared to amend the Republican Party to employ an out-of-state law firm to handle the case.

“I understand she’s from Florida and has a little unfamiliarity with the law,” said Assistant Attorney Russell Willard, after a presentation from a Florida-based attorney hired by the Republican Party.

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