June 25, 2021

Massachusetts has a chance to see the NASA test release Wednesday night

After another day of delay due to weather, the NASA test will give another attempt at a launch site Wednesday night, which will be visible across much of the East Coast. The work was originally scheduled to begin on Saturday, but was delayed due to wind exceeding the limits for safe launch. Another attempt for Tuesday night was wiped out due to cloudy skies. The rocket launch on Monday was postponed “because it was not within the range required for safe launch”. NASA says the rocket is scheduled to launch just before 8:06 a.m. Wednesday. The launch window will close at 8:41 p.m. The space company plans to stream the launch site live. Unlike Tuesday, when the sky was clear across Massachusetts, Storm Team 5’s Mike Vangum says there is a chance of some scattered clouds and rain that could affect visibility during the storm. With a rocket launch, it is visible in the southeastern sky of Massachusetts for about 30-60 seconds, making it look like a tiny dot moving rapidly across the sky. The four-stage Black Brand XII rocket undergoes an experiment designed to study how energy and velocity are transported between different parts of a magnetically connected space. About 10 minutes after launch, the rocket will release barium vapor, which NASA says is harmless, in the Atlantic Ocean north of Bermuda. “As soon as the vapor is released, the spherical clouds are a mixture of green and violet, but that phase lasts only about 30 seconds when the non-ionized component of the cloud spreads. After exposure to sunlight, the vapor clouds quickly ionize and take on a violet color,” NASA explained in the transcript of the mission. Bound with magnetic field lines and spreading parallel to field lines, but not perpendicular to it. At latitudes in the mid-Atlantic, the field lines are inclined approximately 45 degrees to the horizontal, so violet clouds extend obliquely and look like narrower paths than the cloud. Because the motion of the neutral part of the clouds is not controlled by magnetic field lines, they spread rapidly and become very thin faster than the ionized elements of the naked eye. ”

After another day of delay due to weather, the NASA test will give another attempt at a launch site Wednesday night, which will be visible across much of the East Coast.

The work was originally scheduled to begin on Saturday, but was delayed due to wind exceeding the limits for safe launch.

Another attempt for Tuesday night was wiped out due to cloudy skies. The rocket launch was postponed on Monday because “high-altitude air is not within the limits required for safe launch.”

NASA says the rocket is now scheduled to launch just before 8:06 pm Wednesday. The launch window will close at 8:41 p.m.

The space company plans Stream the output live.

Unlike Tuesday, when the sky was right across Massachusetts, there was a chance of some scattered clouds and rain that could affect visibility on Wednesday, according to Storm Team 5’s Mike Wankam.

With a rocket launch, it is visible in the southeastern sky of Massachusetts for about 30-60 seconds, making it look like a tiny dot moving rapidly across the sky.

The four-stage Black Brand XII rocket undergoes an experiment designed to study how energy and velocity are transported between different parts of a magnetically connected space. About 10 minutes after launch, the rocket will release barium vapor that NASA says is harmless in the Atlantic Ocean north of Bermuda.

“As soon as the vapor is released, the spherical clouds are a mixture of green and violet, but that phase lasts for about 30 seconds when the non-ionized component of the cloud propagates. The vapor clouds quickly take on the ionization and violet color after exposure to sunlight,” NASA explained. Summary of the task.

“The ionized portion of the cloud binds to the magnetic field lines and extends parallel to the field lines, but not perpendicular to it. Because they are not controlled by lines, they spread and become very thin faster than the ionized components of the naked eye. “